Case Study: Mary Njoki, 65

Our Aberdares clean cook stove project in Kenya started in 2011, and now contains approximately 10,000 stoves. Since the arrival of the carbon zero stoves in Lari district, the beneficiaries have had time to experience the benefits and switched the majority of their cooking over to them.

We recently spoke to Mary Njoki a 65 year old woman from Bathi Village and a single mother of six children who have all married and moved in with their own families. She lives alone with her two grandchildren and manages a small farm to put meals on the table.

Case Study Aberdares

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary says “the carbon zero stove has really helped me in saving time  and money because  before the introduction  of carbon zero stoves in the area I used to spend much of my  time visiting Kereita forest everyday collecting firewood which  is about 3km from my home, spending like 5 hours in a day. But since I received the carbon zero stove, I only visit kereita forest once per week because the stove is more efficient as compared to 3-stone stoves. On the other hand before introduction of carbon zero stoves I used to spend kshs. 250 to purchase  one bundle which could last for only three days but these days one bundle goes for two weeks with the same mode of cooking as before which means  that I end up saving over Kshs.750 after two weeks

She also added that ‘nowadays I spend much of my time and money these days to concentrate on my farming activities i.e. planting carrots, kales, potatoes, cabbages and pruning peas trees and also spending some of my money to educate my grandchildren’

She went on to say that, “I can testify that carbon zero stoves produce less soot/smoke as compared to 3-stone stoves which my neighbor Mama Grace uses everyday causing more problems on her family’s health” 

“Umuganda”

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CO2balance has been working in Rwanda for several years now, and as a company, we really enjoy learning about the unique cultures and practices of the country. . .

Tomorrow is the last Saturday of the month. Here in the UK, people may be planning to go shopping, take a day trip, or perhaps see their friends. . . In Rwanda, something different will be happening. “Umuganda” means “Community Service.” On the last Saturday of each month, there is a mandatory community service day, designed to be a day of contribution and building the country by citizens themselves. The start of this practice goes back to colonial times and is still practiced today. On this day, business activity halts, public transportation is limited, and people are seen working everywhere across the whole of Rwanda. Activities may include cleaning the streets, cutting grass along roads, or repairing public facilities. People with particular skills offer their services for free on this day, for example, Doctors may offer free medical examination.

The day is intended to build community involvement and strengthen cohesion between communities. People can also access authorities to articulate their needs and voice opinions on various issues. It’s great to see a whole country pulling together and demonstrating community spirit, and it’s things like this that make Rwanda such a great place to work!